Red Sparrow, Jennifer Lawrence

The latest adult spy movie “Red Sparrow”, arrestingly visceral and cerebral at the same time introduces high-end assassins and spies ready to kill and destroy at all costs without the usual gun and gadgets fare typical of recent spy films.

Based on the tome by Jason Matthews, “Red Sparrow” is directed by Francis Lawrence that stars an impressive, international cast that includes Jennifer Lawrence, Joel Edgerton, Charlotte Rampling, Joely Richardson, Matthias Schoenaerts and Jeremy Irons.

Jennifer Lawrence takes on the shoes of prima ballerina Dominika Egorova who, after suffering an injury is pulled into the world of espionage by his patriot Uncle Vanya (Schoenaerts).  Against her will, Dominika becomes an asset of the Russian government in order to keep her home and medical care for her mother (Richardson).  She is then admitted to Sparrow school, where her sexuality is weaponized as she plays pawn to the powers that forced her into becoming a spy.  Her training ultimately leads her to CIA operative Nate Nash, portrayed in the film by Joel Edgerton.  Author Matthews explains the unusual courtship between Nate and Dominika: “Inevitably, they fall in love, which is dangerous and forbidden for him.  Like Romeo and Juliet, it’s a love affair that can’t end well.” Dominika is actually a civilian who is forced into a spy plot, and whose training in spy craft is a means to survive, and to protect her mother.”

“Dominika and Nate have a really interesting relationship,” observes Jennifer Lawrence. “Because they both been assigned to one another to get information and in this process of manipulating each other they fall for each other. Their relationship is constantly changing because how can you trust somebody not to be tricking you when you are trying to trick them? So they’re constantly balancing this inherent trust that they both have in each other with the basic paranoia that goes with living in a life of international espionage.”

The actress enjoyed the process of working with Edgerton: “I love Joel!” she laughs. He’s so talented. His accent was flawless, which was very intimidating for me as I tried to master a Russian accent.  And he’s just fun, a really hard worker and he played the character perfectly.  I can’t imagine it being anyone else.  He brought so much more to the movie and so much to that role.”

Edgerton also responded to Red Sparrow’s cerebral approach to the spy genre.  “I think it’s somewhat more interesting that the operatives are not smashing cars and shooting machine guns,” he says. “What they’re doing is often a big psychological game of chess.”

“There has not been a Francis Lawrence movie like this,” concludes Peter Chernin.  “And there has not been a Jennifer Lawrence movie like this and there has never been a spy movie like this!  It’s a gripping and emotional ride, full of twists and turns, you will be immersed in it and leave talking about it. That’s a promise.”

                “Red Sparrow” is now showing (opened February 28) in cinemas nationwide from 20th Century Fox.  Rated R16 by the MTRCB without cuts.

The movie is also available in IMAX, with its floor-to-ceiling screen, crystal clear images, and surround sound system that will all let you see, hear, and feel even the tiniest of actions like exactly when a pin or tear drop falls. With every detail enhanced by IMAX’s digital re-mastering, you will be sure to seize every feature of the film – from its bursts of action, sultry scenes, to its heart breaking moments, IMAX is designed to make your movie bigger and better.



Mopsy (Elizabeth Debicki), Flopsy (Margot Robbie), Benjamin (Colin Moody), Bea (Rose Byrne), Peter Rabbit (James Corden) and Cottontail (Daisy Ridley) in Columbia Pictures’ PETER RABBIT.

Best known for her role as Ellen Parsons in TV’s Damages, which earned her one Emmy and two Golden Globe nominations, Rose Byrne now stars in Sony Pictures Animation’s Peter Rabbit, the new family comedy based on Beatrix Potter’s beloved characters.

In Peter Rabbit, the mischievous and adventurous hero who has captivated generations of readers now takes on the starring role of his own contemporary comedy. In the film, Peter’s feud with Mr. Thomas McGregor (Domhnall Gleeson) escalates to greater heights than ever before as their fight to gain control of McGregor’s coveted vegetable garden and the affections of the warm-hearted animal lover, Bea, who lives next door (Rose Byrne) extends to the Lake District and London.

McGregor’s next-door neighbor, Bea, has given up the city life to move to a small cottage to attempt to prove herself as a painter. She feels isolated, save for a set of diminutive, furry friends: the rabbits. Peter is her favorite, and she is his.

Rose Byrne talks about the role. “Bea is stubborn and determined, but she’s also torn.  Her talent lies with her animal paintings, not her human portraits, but she doesn’t take that form seriously and hence doesn’t feel like a true artist,” she says. “The animals are her friends and her family, a bit like Snow White meets Jane Goodall.”

“Director Will Gluck’s ambition was a very modern take on a classic tale, which is hard to do,” Byrne continues.  “It’s so beloved so you have to be really tender, but I thought it was genuinely very funny.”

“Rose is luminous,” says producer Jodi Hildebrand.  “She is that person who everyone loves, which was so necessary for our film because Peter loves her, the triplets love her, Benjamin loves her and Thomas McGregor falls in love with her. The audience had to believe the strength of that love, and with Rose they can.”

The challenge for Byrne would come in acting in a film against a lead character that would be animated after photography.  “You have to harness your imaginative powers as much as you can in those scenes,” she explains. “It’s incredibly technical, so besides the director, there are so many heads of departments who need to be watching your every movement — visual effects, special effects, camera department, art department. There are so many complicated steps to creating a successful portrayal of the character and her interaction with her screen partners, a lot of moving parts.”

In Philippine cinemas February 28, Peter Rabbit is distributed in the Philippines by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.



Action icon Bruce Willis becomes mortal grim reaper in “Death Wish” as character’s his life is shattered when his wife was killed and left his daughter in a coma during a robbery attempt in their home.

In “Death Wish”, Dr. Paul Kersey (Bruce Willis) has it all: A beautiful family, a lovely home and an exciting and meaningful career as a surgeon in the emergency room of a bustling hospital. But when Kersey’s wife Lucy (Elisabeth Shue) is killed during a robbery attempt at their home and his daughter Jordan (Camila Morrone) is left in a coma after fighting back against the three attackers, he enters a world he never planned for. Emotionally shut down, Kersey leans on his brother Frank (Vincent D’Onofrio) for help, and on Detectives Raines and Jackson (Dean Norris and Kimberly Elise) for any updates on the arrests of the men who did this to his family.

As the police show Kersey a wall of unsolved cases and become resigned to the fact that his case will also go unsolved, something clicks in Kersey, a man who, as his brother Frank reminds him, used to be known for fighting back in the tough neighborhood they grew up in. Walking into a local gun shop, Kersey decides to arm himself. But his role in the world is saving lives, not taking them. No matter who is wheeled into his emergency room, to Kersey, they’re all patients in need of attention. How could he seek justice on such harsh terms? Yet as Kersey ventures into the night, he finds innocent people being preyed upon. When he foils a violent carjacking and a bystander’s cellphone footage of it goes viral, the media gives this unknown guardian angel a dark nickname: “The Grim Reaper.” As Paul Kersey gets closer to Knox (Beau Knapp) – the criminal who killed his wife – the city, unaware of this mysterious justiceseeker’s motives, wonders how it will end.

Updated from the original novel by Brian Garfield, director Eli Roth and screenwriter Joe Carnahan’s (The Grey, Narc) Death Wish also stars Vincent D’Onofrio (The Magnificent Seven, TV’s Daredevil and Law & Order: Criminal Intent), Elisabeth Shue (Leaving Las Vegas), Camila Morrone, Dean Norris (Breaking Bad) and Kimberly Elise (The Great Debaters). It’s a knife’s-edge portrayal that challenges our assumptions, and pushes our buttons.

By bringing the complex psychology of Brian Garfield’s book up-to-the-moment and injecting new thrills and a stark, unflinching look at the American psyche in 2018, Eli Roth and Death Wish bring audiences to the height of unforgettable suspense.

“Before I had kids, [being a father] wasn’t a part of these action films I do,” says Willis. “Now, it’s a major component. This film really makes you think about how far you will go to protect your family. After his own family is brutalized, Paul Kersey has zero tolerance for any bad guy to harm another innocent person. And we show the audience the underlying reasons why he does what he does.”

A full non-stop action thriller, “Death Wish” opens March 1 in cinemas nationwide from OctoArts Films International.


Teen Titans GO! to the Movies

Warner Bros. Pictures has just released a “Justice League” parody movie poster for “Teen Titans GO! to the Movies.” Check it out below and watch Teen Titans GO! to the Movies” in Philippine cinemas July 26.

Teen Titans GO! to the Movies” finds our egocentric, wildly satirical Super Heroes in their first feature film extravaganza—a fresh, gleefully clever, kid-appropriately crass and tongue-in-cheek play on the superhero genre, complete with musical numbers.

It seems to the Teens that all the major superheroes out there are starring in their own movies—everyone but the Teen Titans, that is! But de facto leader Robin is determined to remedy the situation, and be seen as a star instead of a sidekick. If only they could get the hottest Hollywood film director to notice them. With a few madcap ideas and a song in their heart, the Teen Titans head to Tinsel Town, certain to pull off their dream. But when the group is radically misdirected by a seriously Super-Villain and his maniacal plan to take over the Earth, things really go awry. The team finds their friendship and their fighting spirit failing, putting the very fate of the Teen Titans themselves on the line!

Will Arnett (“The LEGO® Batman Movie”) and Kristen Bell (“Frozen”) lend their voices to the first-ever big-screen version of DC Entertainment and Cartoon Network’s animated TV show, which also stars Greg Cipes (TV’s “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”) as Beast Boy, Scott Menville (TV’s “Spider-Man”) as Robin, Khary Payton (“The Walking Dead”) as Cyborg, Tara Strong (the “My Little Pony” franchise) as Raven, and Hynden Walch (TV’s “Adventure Time with Finn & Jake”) as Starfire, reprising their roles from the series.

The film is being directed by Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail, from a screenplay by Michael Jelenic and Horvath, based on characters from DC. Michail, Will Arnett, Jed Weitzman, and Peggy Regan are producing, with Sam Register, Jelenic, and Horvath serving as executive producers. Apart from Arnett and Weitzman, all are “Teen Titans GO!” series contributors.

Teen Titans GO! to the Movies” is distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.


James Corden, Peter Rabbit

James Corden voices Peter Rabbit in Columbia Pictures’ PETER RABBIT.

British comedian and talk show host James Corden (Into the Woods, The Late Late Showbrings a perfect balance of mischief and charm as the voice of the eponymous hero in Columbia Pictures’ family adventure Peter Rabbit (in Philippine cinemas February 28).

In Peter Rabbit™, the mischievous and adventurous hero who has captivated generations of readers now takes on the starring role of his own contemporary comedy.

In the film, Peter’s feud with Mr. Thomas McGregor (Domhnall Gleeson) escalates to greater heights than ever before as their fight to gain control of McGregor’s coveted vegetable garden and the affections of the warm-hearted animal lover who lives next door (Rose Byrne) extends to the Lake District and London.

It was always the dream to have James as Peter; we essentially wrote the role for him,” says director Will Gluck. “He has the ideal combination of exuberance and sweetness and is of course very, very funny.”

A mischief-maker in his own right, Corden puts aside the wit and gets emotional when it comes to playing the impish rabbit in a little blue coat. “It’s a wonderful story that owes everything to Beatrix Potter,” he says. “I felt incredibly honored that [director] Will Gluck thought my voice could lend itself to this adored rabbit. I met a kid who was so excited – he said, ‘You’re going to be Peter Rabbit,’ and I said, ‘No, Peter Rabbit is Peter Rabbit, he just needed a voice for this film.”

Corden adds, “Peter thinks he has power and ability beyond what’s expected of him. He has that confidence and zest for life – the type of rabbit that doesn’t say ‘why,’ he says ‘why not.’”

Peter had to feel timeless,” says executive producer Jodi Hildebrand. “The key to it was a voice that we wanted to follow on any adventure he chose to go on, and James Corden is that voice and that personality. He’s funny and charming and mischievous, and for us that was the linchpin of bringing Peter to life.”

Corden says, again, it all comes back to the character Beatrix Potter created. “I think Peter gets away with his mischief because of his sweet and adorable nature,” he says. “You just can’t help but smile when you see him.”

Directed by Will Gluck from a screen story and screenplay by Rob Lieber and Will Gluck, based on the characters and tales of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter, the film is produced by Will Gluck and Zareh Nalbandian, with Doug Belgrad, Jodi Hildebrand, and Jason Lust serving as executive producers.

Peter Rabbit is distributed in the Philippines by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.