Tag Archives: happy death day

HAPPY DEATH DAY” OPENS AT NO.1 IN US, SCARES UP $26.5-M

Happy Death Day

It’s celebration time for Universal Pictures and Blumhouse’s Happy Death Day as the new suspense-thriller opened at No.1 in North America this weekend October 6-8, with $26.5 million from 3,149 locations.

(Check out the film’s new spots at http://youtu.be/1vlpzmQTihk and http://youtu.be/2MqmAEG2c6Q and watch Happy Death Day in Philippine cinemas October 18.)

A horror spin on Groundhog Day, Happy Death Day centers on Tree Gelbman (Jessica Rothe) as a woman who wakes up to the same day — her birthday — every day, and is murdered every time. Christopher B. Landon directed the film based on a script by Scott Lobdell.

The film, which earned a B CinemaScore, particularly appealed to female and younger moviegoers — the audience was split 54% female, as opposed to 46% male, and 63% was under age 25. The release date was pegged to Friday the 13th and the weeks leading up to Halloween.

We’re obviously thrilled with the release,” said Universal’s executive VP of domestic distribution Jim Orr. “It’s an original, scary, and exciting twist on the genre,” he added, pointing to the studio’s successful partnership with Blumhouse. “They bring a lot more to the table than the standard genre fare.”

Earlier this year in January, Blumhouse’s Split opened to a monster $40 million in January, and went on to earn $278.3 million worldwide. Then, the next month, Get Out was a smash hit as well with a $33.4 million opening and $253.1 million in global grosses by the end of its run. The production house is also responsible for the hugely profitable Purge and Paranormal Activity franchises.

Happy Death Day is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

COLLEGE GIRL MAKES EVERY DEATH COUNT IN “HAPPY DEATH DAY”

Happy Death Day

She made waves despite a brief but memorable supporting role opposite Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in the Oscar-winning La La Land. Now, star-on-the-rise Jessica Rothe lands the lead role in Universal Pictures’ new suspense-thriller Happy Death Day (in Philippine cinemas Oct. 18).

In the film, Rothe plays a college student named Tree Gelbman who relives the day of her murder with both its unexceptional details and terrifying end until she discovers her killer’s identity.

When Tree is woken up by her cell phone ringing at the beginning of the story, the audience quickly discovers that it is her birthday. She is not thrilled about it being her special day, and is dodging her father’s phone calls…for reasons that will soon allow for character sympathy. It quickly becomes clear that she is not a nice person—and one that has many enemies that might be interested in her vanishing.

Director Christopher Landon sets up her personality: “Tree is initially your stereotypical sorority girl. The world that she exists in is all about appearances: She is focused on her looks, her body and her Instagram.” He pauses. “Still, you get a sense that deep down that is not who she truly is.”

For Landon, it was a no brainer to turn to Rothe for the role of Tree, a character who is in virtually every scene of the film. The director explains: “Jessica is unbelievable because she had to run the gamut. She had to be the uptight bitch, but then she had to be this vulnerable girl trying to figure out her life. On top of that, she needed to be terrified while being hunted down by an unknown killer…and then she had to be empowered and fight back. Her range is incredible.”

Rothe was immediately hooked with the story’s ability to capture her imagination and allow her to experience and present such a range of emotions. “I love when I read scripts that truly pop off the page, capture your emotions and allow you to invest in the lives of the characters. This was one of those scripts for me. The amazing balance of humor, horror, action and heart is something you just do not find often.”

The performer reflects on the exact moment she was positive she had to play Tree: “I knew I had to do this film was when I read the ‘Tree dies six ways while looking for her killer and living her life like a badass set to upbeat pop music’ montage,” she laughs. “This montage is everything that is brilliant about the film. We watch Tree become an active participant in her life instead of a victim, but it is fun—at moments scary—and doesn’t take itself too seriously. Tree is a true modern-day scream queen, and her transformation from bitchy victim to badass heroine is one you do not get to see often. I knew that I had to play her, get in her skin, move around and take her out for a spin.”

Our film is unique in the sense that the moments of heart-pounding suspense are sandwiched with humor, everything from biting wit to fart jokes,” concludes Rothe. “I have always found that the most effective films are those that utilize the juxtaposition of contrasting emotions to heighten each other.”

Happy Death Day is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

WAKE, DIE, REPEAT: IT’S YOUR “HAPPY DEATH DAY”

Happy Death Day

Bending the passage of time has long fascinated storytellers, and the construct of a time loop proves exceptionally compelling in filmmaking. A plot device in which hours or days are repeated and re-experienced by the characters, this loop offers the protagonist some hope of breaking out of the cycle of repetition.

Multiple films across various genres have elegantly pulled it off—from Doug Liman’s Edge of Tomorrow to Richard Curtis’ About Time. Now, time-bending gets tackled anew with surprising results in Universal Pictures’ suspense-thriller Happy Death Day.

(Check out the film’s new spot at http://youtu.be/_5Zzh6G-V-o and watch Happy Death Day in Philippine cinemas October 18.)

A veteran of penning unpredictable screenplays such as Disturbia and Paranormal Activity 2, Christopher Landon moved into the writer/director’s chair for Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones and Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse. A filmmaker who has long shown a knack for staying away from disposable horror films, Landon is drawn to stories that hold a mirror up to society and simultaneously entertain and challenge his audiences.

Once he was presented with Scott Lobdell’s story of Happy Death Day, the director couldn’t help but think of a certain 1993 time-loop classic: “When I read the script, I had the immediate reaction that everybody does: ‘This is the horror-movie version of Groundhog Day! Why has this not been done before?’” he asks. “That was when the light bulb turned on, because the concept alone was a slam dunk to me—it was just really clever.”

Landon reflects on the challenges of a lead character reliving the same day repeatedly: “When you have to keep experiencing the same day over and over again, it is easy to fall into a trap. We establish the day and then we repeat it, so that the audience and the character understand what is happening. Once we do those things, we immediately take Tree off course. She starts to try to outsmart her own death—and in doing so—the story takes the audience to different places and gives them unexpected experiences.”

Known for his innovative work on Marvel Comics’ X-Men titles (“Daredevil,” “Fantastic Four”), Lobdell offers that it was his aim to craft a story in which the lead had to solve her own murder. The writer explains: “Most teen slasher movies feature a series of victims being picked off throughout—once you are terrorized and killed you are never heard from again. I was interested in the idea of a character who gets to react to her death—one who can stalk her killer and who is given to opportunity to make the most of the last day of her life.”

Landon offers that what appealed to him about making this project his next one is that the story represents equal parts humor and terror: “Our scares are scares, people definitely jump and scream, but the laughs are big, too. Comedy and horror, even though they make strange bedfellows, have a lot in common. The lay-up for a scare is very similar to the lay-up for a joke. If you are able to find the rhythm where you able to scare and then to make laugh—and continue to rotate between those two things—it is a lot of fun for the audience.”

Happy Death Day is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

“HAPPY DEATH DAY” TEASER POSTER MAKES A DEADLY CUT

Happy Death Day

The first poster for the new suspense thriller Happy Death Day has just been unveiled by Universal Pictures and Blumhouse. The film is co-written and directed by Christopher Landon (Scouts’ Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse).

Check out the film’s teaser one-sheet art below and watch Happy Death Day in Philippine cinemas on Oct. 11, 2017.

Blumhouse (Split, Get Out, Whiplash) produces an original and inventive rewinding thriller in Happy Death Day, in which a college student (Jessica Rothe, La La Land) relives the day of her murder with both its unexceptional details and terrifying end until she discovers her killer’s identity.

The film also stars Israel Broussard, Ruby Modine, Rachel Matthews, and Charles Aitken.

Happy Death Day is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.

WATCH THE TRAILER OF NEW SLASHER FILM “HAPPY DEATH DAY”

happy death day

Universal Pictures and Blumhouse have released the first trailer for the new horror film Happy Death Day. Co-written and directed by Christopher Landon (Scouts’ Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse).

Blumhouse (Split, Get Out, Whiplash) produces an original and inventive rewinding thriller in Happy Death Day, in which a college student (Jessica Rothe, La La Land) relives the day of her murder with both its unexceptional details and terrifying end until she discovers her killer’s identity.

Check out the film’s trailer below and watch Happy Death Day in Philippine cinemas on Oct. 11, 2017.

YouTube: https://youtu.be/qUvZIgnbZGw

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/uipmoviesph/videos/1583228371751557/

The film also stars Israel Broussard, Ruby Modine, Rachel Matthews, and Charles Aitken.

Happy Death Day is distributed in the Philippines by United International Pictures through Columbia Pictures.